Videos

Swinging the compass

Do you remember the hot, breathless June of two years ago? I can’t go sailing yet this season; I can’t even haul out Guiding Star for painting because my wife, Sue, has mild symptoms of coronavirus and the whole family is isolated at home. So I thought I’d share a memory which I’ve finally had time to edit: Allan Hopton adjusting Guiding Star’s compass in Carrick Roads on one of those hot summer days.

Even in these days of satellite positioning and electronic navigation, merchant ships are required to carry a magnetic compass, so compass adjusters such as Allan are still working. Thank goodness, because I always suspected there was something odd about Guiding Star’s compass in its fine 1930s bronze binnacle. Most of the time, it seemed to read correctly but sometimes it seemed to be anything up to ten degrees out. Or was that just the leeway we were making?

My suspicion was correct. I had always imagined that if a magnetic compass was wrong, it was wrong by the same number of degrees whichever way it pointed. But Allan found Guiding Star’s compass deviated by several degrees only when the boat was pointing north-east. On most other bearings, it was fine. As you can see in the video, he fixed a tiny magnet to the side of the binnacle and the compass now reads correctly.

Musical moments in Paimpol

Two hundred traditional boats, six sound stages and brilliant summer sunshine: the Paimpol Festival du Chant de Marin this year was huge fun.

In the midst of all the noise and heat, one man in a small boat created a moment of delight:

Our friends on the French lugger Le Grand Léjon perform as a shanty group called Les Fortunes de Mer. Here they are on stage.

The crew dinner, paella and pudding for 400 in Paimpol’s community hall, surrounded us with song.