Feeling our way in the Brixham Regatta

The Brixham Heritage Regatta turned into an unexpected challenge of navigation and nerves. 

We made a good start across the line in very light wind and mist and willed our way north across Torbay to the first buoy. The one other boat in our Lugger class, Le Grand Lejon from Brittany, weighs nearly twice as much as Guiding Star and fell steadily behind.

However, that was about the end of the race. After we rounded the buoy, boats headed off on different tacks for a long beat south to the windward buoy near Berry Head, but the mist quickly thickened into fog and soon we couldn’t see any of the other 30 boats in the fleet; not even the three 80-foot Brixham trawlers, which are hard to miss. Visibility dropped to 50 metres.

We pressed on for half an hour, navigating by GPS and staring into the fog to keep watch. We heard on the radio first one, then two, boats withdraw from the race. The wind freshened and for a moment we hit 5 knots. But then the Regatta committee abandoned the race entirely and called all boats back.

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Thanks to Sarah’s friend Peter Hunt for this shot of Guiding Star drifting in the mist before the start

Many thanks indeed to Matt for running our radio comms, Mark for helping to navigate, Paul for knowing every inch of Torbay and Brixham Harbour, and Emma and Sarah for calm helming.

I have no idea how the Regatta Committee worked out the results, but we were delighted to win the beautiful Toni Knights Lugger half-model for the first lugger. We were also surprised and happy to be awarded the Noss Marina Shield for Friday’s passage race from Dartmouth to Brixham, even though we were the only boat taking part and had to motor almost all the way because there was no wind. But we did turn up!

Full results are on the Brixham Heritage Regatta website.

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Sarah, Emma and Paul with the Toni Knights Lugger half-model trophy. It’s a model of his own boat, IRIS. Sadly Toni wasn’t able to take part in the Regatta this year

Next morning, the sun shone from a cloudless sky.

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Rafted against the beautiful Breton lugger Le Grand Lejon

More photos below of the Regatta and our passages up from Plymouth and back again. Many thanks to everyone for their photos.

I’m only sorry there are no photos of the epic bacon, egg and fried bread sandwiches made by Jon on the passage up from Plymouth to Dartmouth and Brixham. It was a pity there wasn’t much wind for sailing, Jon, but it was wonderful to have you on board.

About Guiding Star

Guiding Star is a Looe lugger built in 1907 by James Angear for the Soady family and converted into a yacht in the 1930s at Uphams yard in Brixham.

She’s a traditional wooden boat with great character and very steady at sea. She has a gaff mainsail and a lug mizzen; there are no winches but the rig is easy for a small crew to handle because none of the sails is very big. There’s a comfortable saloon with a paraffin lamp, a roomy galley, and five berths.

From 1960-1989 Guiding Star was owned by Brigadier John (“Jack”) Glennie, who sailed her all around Europe. She was then substantially rebuilt in the early 1990s by Barry Jobson and Jackie Gillespie, who sailed her to the Caribbean and back and took part in many classic regattas. Her current owners are Paul and Sue Eedle.

Length overall with bowsprit out 15.8 metres 52 feet

Length overall with bowsprit and outrigger out 22 metres 72 feet

Length with spars shipped 13.1 metres 43 feet

Length on deck 11.8 metres 39 feet

Length at waterline 11.5 metres 37 feet 9 inches

Draft 1.95 metres 6 feet 5 inches

Beam 3.26 metres 10 feet 8 inches

Displacement approx 16 tonnes

The best of 2017

Looe Luggers Regatta 2017

Guiding Star came second! Weather kept several regular boats away and stopped us racing on the first day, but we managed two races on the second day.

Crew from left to right: Candice, Theo, Alan, Paul, Alan

Many thanks to the Looe Sailing Club for the video on YouTube, and for their wonderful welcome to all the crews during the weekend. Watch Guiding Star at 8 minutes 27 seconds into the film.

 

Winter work

When I bought Guiding Star, the surveyor suggested replacing the keel bolts. Once we hauled the boat out in Bristol in December 2016, it was clear he was right. Martin from RB Boatbuilding lifted out five tons of lead to get at the bolts.

That was just the start of the winter work.

 

 

Sail on a 1907 Cornish fishing boat